When I’m Afraid

Fear may be our most common human emotion. We experience it in many forms: anxiety, dread, worry, terror, etc. Fear is a reaction to a perceived threat. But there’s a greater reality than that which makes us fearful, and Jesus invites us into that truth. Four times in the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus tells his disciples, “Don’t be afraid.” We’ll dive into one each Sunday, April 8 -29. 

 

“When I am afraid, I put my trust in you.” Psalm 56:3

 


When I’m Afraid of Bullies

Sunday, April 8

{Matthew 10:16, 26-31}

Once you speak up for someone, you may be left out and lied about. Once you stand up for something, you may be pushed around and pushed aside. People with power may hurt you, but Jesus says, “Don’t be afraid of them. They can only kill you.” 

 

 


When I’m Afraid of Ghosts and Failure

Sunday, April 15

{Matthew 14:22-33}

We fear what we don’t understand. We prefer our circumstances to be safe and predictable. But how seldom they are! Whether we’re afraid of the eerie or our own inadequacy, Jesus reaches out his hand and says, “It is I. Don’t be afraid!”

 

 


When I’m Afraid of Getting Too Close to God

Sunday, April 22

{Matthew 17:1-8}

Many today consider it silly to fear God, but people of ancient times knew better. Those encountering the majestic, divine presence were leveled by it. Sometimes God gets too close for comfort. His brilliant holiness illuminates our sin, leaving us no place to hide. That’s when Jesus touches us. He says, “Get up. Don’t be afraid.”

                                                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                                                                                        

When I’m Afraid to Believe – and Not Believe

Sunday, April 29

{Matthew 28:1-10}

Fear stops us dead in our tracks. It paralyzes us. So before we can carry out Jesus’s command, we must first put away our fear. When our reaction is to fall down and become immobilized, he says, “Don’t be afraid! Go and tell!”